Friday, March 31, 2017

Spinning Pages (8): A Boy Called Bat/Baby Steps


Oftentimes, while I'm reading a song will pop into my head because the book makes me think of it; sometimes the reverse happens and a random song will make me think of a book I have readSpinning Pages is a combination of my love for books and music. More often than not, inspiration for these posts strikes while I have music thumping in my ears while exercising (kind of like how this feature came to be). 



A Boy Called Bat proved to be somewhat difficult to pair with a song. I listened to countless songs in my search; while repeatedly returning to one that I had not listened to in years. I wanted a song that, in my opinion, captured some of the warmth that the book left me with. 

I hope y'all will enjoy this week's pairing of Elana K. Arnold's A Boy Called Bat with SNSD Taetiseo's Baby Steps

Baby Steps by SNSD Taetiseo-
Oh, with trembling steps,
I carefully approach you
Oh, the closer I get to you
Somehow the more I’m afraid
that you’ll get farther away
It’s so hard to read your eyes
All day I’m cautious around you
(translated lyrics from Color Coded Lyrics)

Why these lyrics? Well, it reminded me, in general, of the book and how it took time for Bat to open up to people. Yes. he sometimes had difficulty with reading people and what a situation meant, yet he was such a sweet character.  Even though the rest of  the lyrics don't exactly fit the book, this beat of the song mixed with the vocals of the trio always made it worth listening to (even before I discovered what they were actually saying).

Want to know why I believe you should read Elana K. Arnold's A Boy Called Bat, then check out my review to see why I loved it!


Wednesday, March 29, 2017

I Want to Read It (50): The Republic of Pirates



I Want to Read It, a hybrid between WLW (or WOW) and what's on my to-be read pile. Well, instead of focusing just on books I would like to acquire, I will be using it to feature books that I just want to read. From the one's I want to buy to the one's sitting on my TBR at home.



The Republic of Pirates: Being the True and Surprising Story of the Caribbean Pirates and the Man Who Brought Them Down by Colin Woodard, May 7, 2007. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Source: Own
The inspiration for the NBC series Crossbones. In the early eighteenth century a number of the great pirate captains, including Edward "Blackbeard" Teach and "Black Sam" Bellamy, joined forces. This infamous "Flying Gang" was more than simply a thieving band of brothers. Many of its members had come to piracy as a revolt against conditions in the merchant fleet and in the cities and plantations in the Old and New Worlds. Inspired by notions of self-government, they established a crude but distinctive form of democracy in the Bahamas, carving out their own zone of freedom in which indentured servants were released and leaders chosen or deposed by a vote. They were ultimately overcome by their archnemesis, Captain Woodes Rogers—a merchant fleet owner and former privateer—and the brief though glorious moment of the Republic of Pirates came to an end. In this unique and fascinating book, Colin Woodard brings to life this virtually unexplored chapter in the Golden Age of Piracy.
Why


I have actually had this book in my possession for, well, almost as long as it has been available. I may have "adopted" it from my dad when it looked like it was going to be let go during one of the spring cleanings. What can I say, it looked interesting and I was curious as to how pirates were actually in comparison to what you see portrayed in film and books (looks at beloved favorite of Treasure Island)

Also, I really like history, so, maybe this will be the year that I actually read and make use of my efforts to keep it around. 

Have you read it, if so what were your thoughts on it? Is it something you would read (given the chance)?

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Teaser Tuesday: The Whydah: A Pirate Ship Feared, Lost & Found

Teaser Tuesdays is hosted by MizB of Books And A Beat. To participate, simply do the following: Grab your current read Open to a random page Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn't give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Monday, March 27, 2017

All About Middle Grade Review: The Whydah: A Pirate Ship Feared, Wrecked, and Found



The Whydah: A Pirate Ship Feared, Wrecked, and Found by Martin W. Sandler, March 14, 2017. 176 pages. Published by Candlewick Press. Source: ARC received from publisher.
The exciting true story of the captaincy, wreck, and discovery of the Whydah the only pirate ship ever found and the incredible mysteries it revealed. 
The 1650s to the 1730s marked the golden age of piracy, when fearsome pirates like Blackbeard ruled the waves, seeking not only treasure but also large and fast ships to carry it. The Whydah was just such a ship, built to ply the Triangular Trade route, which it did until one of the greediest pirates of all, Black Sam Bellamy, commandeered it. Filling the ship to capacity with treasure, Bellamy hoped to retire with his bounty but in 1717 the ship sank in a storm off Cape Cod. For more than two hundred years, the wreck of the Whydah (and the riches that went down with it) eluded treasure seekers, until the ship was finally found in 1984 by marine archaeologists. The artifacts brought up from the ocean floor are priceless, both in value and in the picture they reveal of life in that much-mythologized era, changing much of what we know about pirates."
First Sentence

In February 1717, Captain Lawrence Prince was heading home, back to England, on his ship the Whydah, which was loaded with a fortune in gold, silver, and other valuable goods.



To be completely honest, it was not so much the idea of pirates that made me accept The Whydah for review so much as it was about shipwrecks. It must be from living on the coasts as the history of ships wrecked upon coastlines has always, and I mean always, been a source of intrigue for me. Partly because of all that history that is lying under all that water.


  • Oddly enough, I cannot ever recall having heard of the pirate ship Whydah. Although I had heard of Black Sam Bellamy; so it was interesting to learn more about his story and how he quickly rose to infamy upon the seas and then just as quickly disappeared. While I cannot vouch for some of the theories about his pre-pirate days, I do think this book was well researched.
  • For a non-fiction historical, this book was pretty fast paced as the story just whipped along. Martin W. Sandler took off running with his telling of the ship Whydah and its journey from slave trader to that of flag ship of a pirate fleet. I probably already said this but...it was just really a fascinating look into history.

  • As much as I enjoyed reading about the Whydah, there was one thing that I did not like about the book. At times, it felt like the authors obsession with the Whydah and locating it made him, to be blunt, over glorify the life of a pirate. Sure, he touched on the less than refined ways they acted and the perils of piracy; yet, his obsession with finding the ship was, well, it was somewhat excessive. Being passionate about something you enjoy is great and all, but...
  • All in all, it was a truly fascinating read. The story started prior to Sam Bellamy becoming a pirate; it also talked about why so many turned to piracy which was immensely interesting. How pirates chose their targets; as well as what they did not do because movies are not that great at getting the facts correct. Lastly, it covered the efforts that went into discovering the location of the Whydah and what they found.

Final Verdict: The Whydah: A Pirate Ship Feared, Lost and Found- Rather exciting look at the history of the Whydah and the search to finally locate the wreck. 

 The Whydah: A Pirate Ship Feared, Lost and Found earns


A advanced copy of this book was received in consideration for review. All thoughts are my own.

Friday, March 24, 2017

Spinning Pages (7): Four-Four-Two/Goodnight Saigon


Oftentimes, while I'm reading a song will pop into my head because the book makes me think of it; sometimes the reverse happens and a random song will make me think of a book I have readSpinning Pages is a combination of my love for books and music. More often than not, inspiration for these posts strikes while I have music thumping in my ears while exercising (kind of like how this feature came to be). 


From the moment I finished reading Dean Hughes' Four-Four-Two, I knew that this would be the song I would use for it. While the song may be about the Vietnam War, I feel that it is also a good fit for this book as the song kept popping into my head as I was reading.


Goodnight Saigon by Billy Joel (written and song); also covered by Garth Brooks-
We met as soulmates
On Parris Inland
We left as inmates
From an asylum
And we were sharp
As sharp as knives
And we were so gung
ho to lay down our lives

We came in spastic
Like tameless horses
We left in plastic
As numbered corpses
And we learned fast
To travel light
Our arms were heavy
but our bellies were tight
And it was dark
So dark at night
And we held onto each other
Like brother to brother
We promised our mothers we'd write

And we would all go down together
We said we'd all go down together
Yes we would all go down together

So many of the lyrics reminded me of the characters; especially how eager they were when they first enlisted. You know since they really did not know what exactly it was that they had signed up for. There were also, as you'll see, the lines that spoke of the strong friendships that were forged among the soldiers who fought together. These were the lyrics from Billy Joel's Goodnight Saigon that came into my mind as I was reading Four-Four-Two by Dean Hughes. 

Do you need further convincing on why you should give Dean Hughes' Four-Four-Two a chance, then check out my review and see why I think you should read it. 

Just a warning, the song may give you the chills (or if you're like my sister, make you teary).

You can watch the official video of Billy Joel's Goodnight Saigon below.

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Non-Fiction Review: How to Pack


How to Pack: Travel Smart for Any Trip by Hitha Palepu, March 7, 2017. 128 pages. Published by  Clarkson Potter Publishers. Source: Blogging for Books.
It's time to pack perfect. Every trip, every time. Your journey starts here. When you travel, the journey is just as important as the destination--and packing is the first step. In How to Pack, Hitha Palepu, a former consultant who has traveled more than 500,000 cumulative miles around the world, shows that what and how you pack are who you are. Confidence and comfort inspire success upon arrival, whether you're exploring a new city, hoping to nail a job interview, or relaxing on a beach. In How to Pack, you'll learn about:
- Power Pieces vs. Fantasy Pieces: How clothing earns its place in your suitcase
- The Accessory Math Secret: The precise formula for all you need to finish off your outfits
- Folding versus Rolling: What's right for which items
- Globetrotter Gorgeous: Editing your beauty routine while still looking great
- The Packing Timeline: How to avoid "I'm forgetting something" syndrome
- Pack Perfect Lists: Samples and blanks for any kind of trip



Okay, while this may not be the typical book you'll see featured here, I just could not resist. Not only is the binding darling, especially in person, Hitha Palepu has some wonderful advice for how to pack. Not only for the trip, whatever kind it may be, but how to be a confident packer as well as how to roll that confidence in packing into whatever you're setting out for.
  • First off, I really enjoyed the way Hitha Palepu wrote. She took what could have been a dull topic and just made it fun. Each section was short yet very insightful. 
  • Another reason I found myself enjoying How to Pack was that she explained her reasoning on packing this way in an open way. There was no judging; just Hitha Palepu trying to pass on what she's learned from her extensive traveling. Also, it was not like she was commanding you to pack a certain way, or certain items, to do it "right". Just, you know, suggestions on how to make the whole process smoother. 
  • I don't know about you, but I did not think the book could get even better. I mean come on, the binding is adorable as can be and the contents are super helpful, BUT! But there's tear out packing lists in the back to help you out! All to make sure that you don't over-pack or forget something vital. 

Final Verdict: How to Pack- Delightfully packaged and full of useful information! Definitely a must-have for travelers looking to learn the art of packing smartly for all trips (business and pleasure).

How to Pack earns

A copy of this book was received through Blogging for Books in consideration for review. All thoughts are my own.

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

I Want to Read It (49): A Taste for Monsters



I Want to Read It, a hybrid between WLW (or WOW) and what's on my to-be read pile. Well, instead of focusing just on books I would like to acquire, I will be using it to feature books that I just want to read. From the one's I want to buy to the one's sitting on my TBR at home.




A Taste for Monsters by Matthew J. Kirby, September 27, 2016. Published by Scholastic. Source: Want to Read.
Fear the living more than the dead.
It’s London 1888, and Jack the Ripper is terrorizing the people of the city. Evelyn, a young woman disfigured by her dangerous work in a matchstick factory, who has nowhere to go, does not know what to make of her new position as a maid to the Elephant Man in the London Hospital. Evelyn wants to be locked away from the world, like he is, shut in from the filth and dangers of the streets. But in Joseph Merrick, the Elephant Man, she finds a gentle kindred who does not recoil from her and who understands her pain.
When the murders begin, however, Joseph and Evelyn are haunted nightly by the ghosts of the Ripper’s dead, setting Evelyn on a path to facing her fears and uncovering humanity’s worst nightmares.
Why

First off, I don't recall hearing much, if anything, about this book last year. I just stumbled upon it whilst browsing Goodreads a coupe weeks ago. While it may not have the highest ranking on there, I am intrigued enough to give it a chance. 

What really makes it sound interesting is the two characters, Evelyn and Joseph, and how they must face their fears to, I'm assuming, help stop Jack the Ripper or something (the synopsis is rather vague)... 

Truthfully, it could be a great read or a terrible one (like all books) and should my library have it, I may look into reading it. 

Have you read A Taste for Monsters, if so, what did you think of it??

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Teaser Tuesday: Four-Four-Two

Teaser Tuesdays is hosted by MizB of Books And A Beat. To participate, simply do the following: Grab your current read Open to a random page Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn't give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Monday, March 20, 2017

YA Review: Four-Four-Two


Four-Four-Two by Dean Hughes, November 8, 2016. 272 pages. Published by Atheneum Books for Young Readers. Source: Borrowed from Library.
From the author of Soldier Boys and Search and Destroy comes a thought-provoking, action-packed page-turner based on the little-known history of the Japanese Americans who fought with the 442nd Regimental Combat Team during World War II.

Yuki Nakahara is an American.

But it’s the start of World War II, and America doesn’t see it that way. Like many other Japanese Americans, Yuki and his family have been forced into an internment camp in the Utah desert. But Yuki isn’t willing to sit back and accept this injustice—it’s his country too, and he’s going to prove it by enlisting in the army to fight for the Allies.

When Yuki and his friend Shig ship out, they aren’t prepared for the experiences they’ll encounter as members of the “Four-Four-Two,” a segregated regiment made up entirely of Japanese-American soldiers. Before Yuki returns home—if he returns home—he’ll come face to face with persistent prejudices, grueling combat he never imagined, and friendships deeper than he knew possible.

First Sentence
Yuki Nakahara was stacking wooden boxes according to size in a musty storage shed.

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

I Want to Read It (48): Frazzled: Everyday Disasters and Impending Doom



I Want to Read It, a hybrid between WLW (or WOW) and what's on my to-be read pile. Well, instead of focusing just on books I would like to acquire, I will be using it to feature books that I just want to read. From the one's I want to buy to the one's sitting on my TBR at home.




Frazzled: Everyday Disasters and Impending Doom (Frazzled, 1) by Booki Vivat, September 27, 2016. Published by HarperCollins. Source: Wishlist.
Meet Abbie Wu! She’s about to start middle school and she’s totally in crisis.
Abbie Wu is in crisis—and not just because she’s stuck in a family that doesn’t quite get her or because the lunch ladies at school are totally corrupt or because everyone seems to have a “Thing” except her. Abbie Wu is in crisis always.
Heavily illustrated and embarrassingly honest, Frazzled dives right into the mind of this hilariously neurotic middle school girl as she tries to figure out who she is, where she belongs, and how to survive the everyday disasters of growing up. With Abbie’s flair for the dramatic and natural tendency to freak out, middle school has never seemed so nerve-racking!


Why

Frazzled sounds like a delight! I cannot even put into words why this book intrigues me when usually the thought of overly dramatic characters make me want to swat them upside the head. Yet, this book sounds delightfully funny and, well, I kinda need it now.

Have you read Frazzled? What did you think of it?

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Teaser Tuesday: A Boy Called Bat

Teaser Tuesdays is hosted by MizB of Books And A Beat. To participate, simply do the following: Grab your current read Open to a random page Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn't give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Monday, March 13, 2017

All About Middle Grade [Blog Tour] Review: A Boy Called Bat


I am thrilled to be one of the stops for Elana K. Arnold's A Boy Called Bat- which was such a fantastic, heartwarming read...and you (all of you) just need to read it (lucky you, it comes out tomorrow)!! My thanks to all the awesome people at Walden Pond Press for the chance to read and take part in the blog tour for this book!!

About the author
Elana K. Arnold grew up in Southern California, where she was lucky enough to have her own perfect pet—a gorgeous mare named Rainbow—and a family who let her read as many books as she wanted. She is the author of picture books, middle grade novels, and books for teens. She lives in Huntington Beach, California, with her husband, two children, and a menagerie of animals.

You can haunt Elana K. Arnold at-
Website | Twitter | Goodreads |



First Sentence
Bixby Alexander Tam stared into the refrigerator, trying to decide what to eat.

My Thoughts

I fear that there are no words to do A Boy Called Bat justice. It was such a beautiful, heartwarming read; it left me feeling stuffed with such a warm feeling- I don't say that lightly, y'all.

  •  A Boy Called Bat, the first of Elana K. Arnold's books that I have ever read. And, it was so beautifully written; full of warmth and joy that left me smiling long after I turned the final page. What started out as me sampling the first page, turned in to me devouring the entire story of Bat and his quest to become the best skunk keeper ever (with the goal of becoming more than a foster caregiver for said skunk). 

  • As I mentioned above, this was my first taste of Elana K/ Arnold's writing; and I must say that I would really enjoy more middle grade books from her (hint, hint). Her writing really drew me as she did a wonderful job creating her characters and the setting for the book. There were two things, about the story, that really impressed me above all others. She was able to write about two big things, of which I'll speak on shortly, in a way that did not detract from the story she was telling.  I really loved how she deftly spoke of these two aspects, divorce and Autism, in a way that let them speak for themselves. It was done in a way that will resonate with young readers and with their parents as it'll find them where they are. 

  • Even though Bat and his sister Janie bickered, I really liked their sibling dynamic. It was just so, well, natural as siblings do bicker. I also really enjoyed watching Bat blossom throughout the book as his world was opened. 
  • Last, but not least, the illustrations. Charles Santoso's illustrations were a very nice addition to the story. They really highlighted some of the best scenes, like when Bat's mom first introduced them to the skunk kit and the beginnings of friendship between Bat and one of his classmates. 


Final Verdict: A Boy Called Bat- If you're looking for a book that will make you smile and just happy, then this is the book for you. Beautifully written and just full of heart (in the best way).

A Bay Called Bat earns


A Boy Called Bat by Elana K. Arnold, illustrated by Charles Santoso, March 14, 2017. 208 pages. Published by Walden Pond Press. Source: publisher for review.
For Bixby Alexander Tam (nicknamed Bat), life tends to be full of surprises—some of them good, some not so good. Today, though, is a good-surprise day. Bat’s mom, a veterinarian, has brought home a baby skunk, which she needs to take care of until she can hand him over to a wild-animal shelter.

But the minute Bat meets the kit, he knows they belong together. And he’s got one month to show his mom that a baby skunk might just make a pretty terrific pet.

You can add A Boy Called Bat to your Goodreads shelf, too. 

A copy of this book was received from the publisher in consideration for review. All thoughts are my own.

Friday, March 10, 2017

Spinning Pages (6): Treasure Island/El Dorado


Oftentimes, while I'm reading a song will pop into my head because the book makes me think of it; sometimes the reverse happens and a random song will make me think of a book I have readSpinning Pages is a combination of my love for books and music. More often than not, inspiration for these posts strikes while I have music thumping in my ears while exercising (kind of like how this feature came to be). 



Ever since the idea for this feature struck me, there's been one song that I was hoping to pair up with a book-Exo's El Dorado. It may seem like that not long of time, except Spinning Pages has been in the works for almost a year... 

So, you may be wondering, "What on earth does a kpop song have in common with a classic book?" Simple, Treasure Island brought  El Dorado to mind with both being about those who sought treasure. Also, I just really like both the book and the song.


El Dorado by Exo
I had the same dream again
I was at an endless desert
There is a dazzling city
But it always vanishes before I get there

I’m going toward the place I have to go

I can’t confirm anything
I can’t promise anything but

Find the El Dorado, I’m leaving right now
The bigger the adventure, the more danger that follows

Into the light that spreads out before us
Toward the future that no one knows of
This walk will be a legend in the days to come
The El Dorado
(Translated lyrics from Kpop Lyrics)

As much as Jim Hawkins wanted adventure, and of course treasure, you know that the whole quest was more than he bargained for. As for the song, I liked how they were heading towards El Dorado hoping it would not disappear before they arrived; kind of like how the crew hoped the treasure would still be there on the island. That and how neither one knew what would befall them as they sought the treasure; which I thought was pretty fascinating.

Of course, these are just my thoughts on why I thought Treasure Island and El Dorado made an interesting pairing. Need further convincing that you should read Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island, then please check out my review.

Have you read Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island or listened to EXO's El Dorado? If so, let me know what you thought of them!!


Wednesday, March 8, 2017

I Want to Read It (47): Scarlet Letter



I Want to Read It, a hybrid between WLW (or WOW) and what's on my to-be read pile. Well, instead of focusing just on books I would like to acquire, I will be using it to feature books that I just want to read. From the one's I want to buy to the one's sitting on my TBR at home.



Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, 1994 (originally published March 16, 1850). 180 pages. Published by Dover. Source: Own.
Nathaniel Hawthorne’s most famous novel was published in 1850 and takes place in Puritan New England, focusing on a community where a beautiful young woman, Hester Prynne, and her illegitimate child are subject to persecution and ostracism; while the mother refuses to name her co-conspirator in adultery, and the father of her child burns up with secret guilt and shame. Hawthorne’s family history caused much of his interest in this time period, but his spiritual leanings toward the popular Transcendental movement precipitated this classic novel where oppression, injustice and intolerance – and their consequences – are explored in turn. 

Why

 I have actually already read The Scarlet Letter, but it has been some time since then. I'll be rereading Nathaniel Hawthornes most popular book for #ReadJane (find me on Twitter if you would like to join us).

I don't quite recall what I thought of it when I first read it, but I'm looking forward to reading it with fresh eyes. I always believe that books need to be read at least twice. Once for the story as it is; and the second time to takeaway what is hidden between the lines

Have you read The Scarlet Letter? If so, what did you think of it?  Would you be interested in reading it with our group (six chapters a week during March; then a wrap-up chat at the end of the month)?

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Teaser Tuesday: Treasure Island

Teaser Tuesdays is hosted by MizB of Books And A Beat. To participate, simply do the following: Grab your current read Open to a random page Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn't give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Monday, March 6, 2017

Classic Review: Treasure Island




Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson, December, 1998 (originally published in 1882). 206 pages. Published by Signet Classics. Source: Own.
The most popular pirate story ever written in English, featuring one of literature’s most beloved “bad guys,” Treasure Island has been happily devoured by several generations of boys—and girls—and grownups. Its unforgettable characters include: young Jim Hawkins, who finds himself owner of a map to Treasure Island, where the fabled pirate booty is buried; honest Captain Smollett, heroic Dr. Livesey, and the good-hearted but obtuse Squire Trelawney, who help Jim on his quest for the treasure; the frightening Blind Pew, double-dealing Israel Hands, and seemingly mad Ben Gunn, buccaneers of varying shades of menace; and, of course, garrulous, affable, ambiguous Long John Silver, who is one moment a friendly, laughing, one-legged sea-cook . . .and the next a dangerous pirate leader!

The unexpected and complex relationship that develops between Silver and Jim helps transform what seems at first to be a simple, rip-roaring adventure story into a deeply moving study of a boy’s growth into manhood, as he learns hard lessons about friendship, loyalty, courage and honor—and the uncertain meaning of good and evil.
First Sentence
Squire Trelawney, Dr. Livesey, and the rest of these gentlemen having asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I take up my pen in the year of grace 17-and go back to the time when my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old seaman with the sabre cut first took up his lodging under our roof.

Friday, March 3, 2017

Spinning Pages (5): Ronit & Jamil/I Hate Myself for Loving You


Oftentimes, while I'm reading a song will pop into my head because the book makes me think of it; sometimes the reverse happens and a random song will make me think of a book I have readSpinning Pages is a combination of my love for books and music. More often than not, inspiration for these posts strikes while I have music thumping in my ears while exercising (kind of like how this feature came to be). 





Even though I was not a fan of Ronit and Jamil, I could not resist pairing it with a song for Spinning Pages. I was not going to pair it a song...that is until I was running errands with my Dad this past weekend and heard this one song on the radio. It just felt like the perfect fit for the book, you know!!

I have teased y'all long enough! So this week's song is from Joan Jett and the Blackhearts (an interesting turn of events, yes)! There were lines in the song that corresponded well with passages from Ronit and Jamil, like the way they would meet clandestinely and message each other.   


I Hate Myself for Loving You by Joan Jett and the Blackhearts-
Midnight, gettin' uptight. Where are you?
You said you'd meet me, now it's quarter to two
I know I'm hangin' but I'm still wantin' you.
I think of you every night and day.
You took my heart, then you took my pride away.
(lyrics found on Google Play Music)



Sure, the song may be about failed relationship, come on he's stringing her along, yet the lyrics I included really seemed, at least to me, to fit the the relationship between the characters in the book. Do you think the lyrics, one's selected for the post, fit the characters from Ronit and Jamil (or Romeo and Juliet)?

Want to know why Ronit and Jamil did not work for me, then hop on over and check out my review from earlier this month.

You can listen, and watch, Joan Jett and the Blackhearts' I Hate Myself for Loving You below!

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

I Want to Read It (46): Matylda, Bright and Tender



I Want to Read It, a hybrid between WLW (or WOW) and what's on my to-be read pile. Well, instead of focusing just on books I would like to acquire, I will be using it to feature books that I just want to read. From the one's I want to buy to the one's sitting on my TBR at home.



Matylda, Bright and Tender by Holly M. McGhee, March 14, 2017. Published by Candlewick Press. Source: TBR/received for review. 
In a courageous debut novel, Holly M. McGhee explores the loss that shakes one girl’s world — and the unexpected consequences of the things we do for love.
Sussy and Guy are best friends, fourth-graders who share their silliest thoughts and deepest hopes. One afternoon, the two of them decide they must have something of their very own to love. After a trip to the pet store, they bring home a spotted lizard, the one with the ancient face and starfish toes, and they name her Matylda (with a y so it’s all her own). With Guy leading the way, they feed her and give her an origin story fit for a warrior lizard. A few weeks later, on a simple bike ride, there is a terrible accident. As hard as it is, Sussy is sure she can hold on to Guy if she can find a way to love Matylda enough. But in a startling turn of events, Sussy reconsiders what it means to grieve and heal and hope and go on, for her own sake and Matylda’s. By turns both devastating and buoyant, this story is a brave one, showing how far we can justify going for a real and true friend. 


Why

I have a feeling this book is going to break my heart! Which makes me somewhat reluctant to read it; yet it sounds like a beautiful book (so maybe I'll survive a heartbreaking read). This week, I decided to raid my TBR for I Want to Read It because it's a never ending list and I'm sure there must be some great titles hiding away there.

I really like the simplicity of the cover. It's not over-the-top and seems to fit the synopsis well. 

Even though I usually run away from emotional books, this one sounds good enough to brave the looming emotions that it promises. It has definitely caught my attention! So well shall see how it goes!!

Do you plan on reading Matylda, Bright and Tender?

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