Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Teaser Tuesday: A Tail of Two Kitties


Teaser Tuesday is hosted by MizB of Books And A Beat. To participate, simply do the following: Grab your current read Open to a random page Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn't give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Monday, May 14, 2018

All About Middle Grade Review: A Tail of Two Kitties

past

A Tail of Two Kitties (Stick Cat, 1) by Tom Watson, May 3, 2016. Published by HarperCollins. Source: Publisher.
There’s a new pet in town.

Stick Cat.

It’s a big day in the big city for Stick Cat and his best friend, Edith. There are treasures to hunt, songs to sing, pigeons to catch, and naps to take. But way up on the twenty-third floor, danger lurks just around the corner. Terrible noises and violent crashes trap a desperate man in the building across the alley. Stick Cat will need to navigate his way across the alley—and around Edith’s peculiar ways—to attempt a rescue.

With Tom Watson’s trademark combination of laughs and adventure, Stick Cat’s high-wire act is sure to please cat lovers and Stick Dog fans everywhere. 
First Sentence
Do you remember our deal from the Stick Dog books?


Wednesday, May 9, 2018

I Want to Read It (51): Mexican Martyrdom



I Want to Read It, a hybrid between WLW (or WOW) and what's on my to-be-read pile. Well, instead of focusing just on books I would like to acquire, I will be using it to feature books that I just want to read. From the ones, I want to buy to the one's sitting on my TBR at home.




Mexican Martyrdom: Firsthand Accounts of the Religious Persecution in Mexico 1926-1935 by Wilfred Parsons, January 1993. 316 pages. Published by Tan Books. 
Mexican Martyrdom is a series of true stories of the terrible anti-Catholic persecutions which took place in Mexico in the 1920s. Told by the Jesuit priest, Fr. Wilfrid Parson, these stories are based upon cases he had seen himself or that had been described to him personally by the people who had undergone the atrocities of those times.

Though most contemporary readers don t know it, a full-fledged persecution of the Church, with thousands of martyrdoms, took place in modern times, just south of our own border including the famous Jesuit priest, Fr. Miguel Pro, was martyred before a firing squad during this persecution.

Between the conquest of Mexico by Cortes in 1521, and the Mexican Independence from Spain in 1821, Spain created in Mexico a great Catholic civilization to rival that of any nation in Europe. But when the Great Mexican Revolution began in 1810, this flourishing country began to wither and die. That Revolution was not to end until 1928, with the end of the brutal rule of President Plutarco Elias Calles, though in many ways it continues still. The heroic resistance of Mexican Catholics during this persecution is a great inspiration to Catholics today.

Mexican Martyrdom proves that hatred for the Catholic Church exists even in our times and can still flare into open and bloody persecution in this so-called enlightened age.
Why

I have been wanting to read Mexican Martyrdom for a couple years now. While I still need to read Blood-Drenched Altars first, as is recommended for a broader scope of what is covered in this book. That aside, I'm really looking forward to delving deeper into the persecutions that happened in Mexico during the early to mid-1900s.

Hey y'all, so if you're looking for history books that give a broader, and let's be honest a deeper, look at contested points in history, then just ask me. 

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

Teaser Tuesday: The Vision, vol 1: Little Better Than a Man


Teaser Tuesday is hosted by MizB of Books And A Beat. To participate, simply do the following: Grab your current read Open to a random page Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn't give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Monday, May 7, 2018

Comic Review: The Vision, vols 1: Little Worse Than a Man


The Vision, vol 1: Little Worse Than a Man by Tom King,  Gabriel Hernandez Walta (Artist), Jordie Bellaire (Colorist), Clayton Cowles (Letterer), Mike del Mundo (Cover Artist), July 12, 2016. Published by Marvel. Source: Borrowed from Library.
The Vision wants to be human, and what's more human than family? So he heads back to the beginning, to the laboratory where Ultron created him and molded him into a weapon. The place where he first rebelled against his given destiny and imagined that he could be more -that he could be a man. There, he builds them. A wife, Virginia. Two teenage twins, Viv and Vin. They look like him. They have his powers. They share his grandest ambition (or is that obsession?) the unrelenting need to be ordinary.
Behold the Visions! They’re the family next door, and they have the power to kill us all. What could possibly go wrong? Artificial hearts will be broken, bodies will not stay buried, the truth will not remain hidden, and the Vision will never be the same.


Well, this was perhaps my least favorite comic that I have read in the past six months. Admittedly, I didn't have high hopes for it because I am not a fan of theVision (even less so after reading this).


  • As I said above, I didn't have high hopes for the Vision going in. He's just not a character that I enjoy reading about and his story has never really interested me. The only reason I decided to pick a copy up from the library is that it, well, it was there and I thought maybe it would prove to be fascinating new take on his story. 


  • I will give The Vision: Little Worse Than a Man one point- it was pretty creepy the story they created here. It was more like a dystopian meets sci-fi meets horror, than your typical Marvel comic. Even so, it was not enough to make me fully embrace the madness of the road that the Vision was heading down. I'll be blunt, the story they created is creepy in more than one way. The first being that you have this machine trying to replicate the dynamics of a normal family, which is not possible no matter how hard he tries. The second being that what comes out of his meddling in things not possible, hmm reminds me so much of Tony Stark and his ego, is nothing short of insanity. 


  • You know what else this book left me feeling, a stronger sense that Iron Man is the biggest problem in the Marvel U as he seems to be the cause of 75% of their problems. But that's a conversation for another time and place. 


  • As much as I disliked the story-line, the artwork really brought things to such vivid life. I felt the artist and colorist really did an excellent job of bringing out the visual aspect of the story. Yeah, it was probably my favorite part because you could really see the madness of the entire plot popping off the pages. Even so, it was not enough to make me see the story in a more favorable light.

Final Verdict: The Vision, vol 1: Little More Than a Man- Well, I'll leave it at this: Not for me. This failed to really hook me, other than leave me horrified in a can't turn away kind of way, and this will be one that I don't plan on pursuing any further than this.
A copy of this book was borrowed from the library. All thoughts are my own.

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